500rs King Carlos I
    Portugal (silver), 1898

GREEK & ROMAN
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and Roman Empire. (480 BC to 450 AD)
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PORTUGAL 1st DIN
Coins from the 1st
Portuguese Dinasty. (1128 to 1383)
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PORTUGAL 2nd DIN
Coins from the 2nd
Portuguese Dinasty. (1385 to 1580)
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PORTUGAL 3rd DIN
Coins from the 3rd
Portuguese Dinasty. (1580 to 1640)
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PORTUGAL 4th DIN
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PORTUGAL REPUBLIC
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Joćo I (1385-1433)

Joćo I, tenth king of Portugal (the Good or sometimes, the Great or even the One With Good Memory), was born in Lisbon on April 11, 1357 and died in the same city on August 14, 1433. He was the natural son of Pedro I by a noble Galician lady called Teresa Lourenēo. In 1364 he was created grand-master of the Order of Aviz. He became king of Portugal in 1385, after the 1383-1385 Crisis.

On April 6 1385, the council of the kingdom (cortes in Portuguese) summoned in Coimbra declared Joćo, then Master of Aviz, king of Portugal. This was in effect a declaration of war against Castile and its pretensions to the Portuguese throne. Soon after, the king of Castile invaded Portugal, with the purpose of conquer Lisbon and remove Joćo I from the throne. Joćo I named Nuno Alvares Pereira, his loyal and talented supporter, general and protector of the kingdom. The invasion was repelled during the Summer after the battle of Atoleiros, but especially after the decisive battle of Aljubarrota (August 14, 1385), where the Castilian army was virtually annihilated. Juan I of Castile then retreated and the stability of Joćo I's throne was permanently secured.

After the death of Juan of Castile, without leaving issue by Beatrice, in 1390, Joćo I ruled in peace and pursued the economic development of the country. The exception was the siege and conquer of the city of Ceuta in 1415. After this military success of extreme strategic importance on the control of the navigation in the African coast, Joćo I returned to a non aggressive policy. Contemporaneous writers describe him as a man of wit, very keen on concentrating the power on himself, but, at the same time, with a benevolent and kind personality. His youth education as Master of a religious order turned him into an unusual learned king in the Middle Ages. His love for knowledge and culture was passed to his sons.
 
   

Joćo I (1385 - 1433)

Real Branco. Obverse: HNS DEI GRA RE PO ET AL. Reverse: ADIVTORIVM NOSTRVN QVI F EECIT CELLVM ET T.

Joćo I (1385 - 1433)

Real de 10 Soldos. Obverse: IHNS DEI GRA REX PO ET ALGARBII. Reverse: ADIVTORIVM NOSTRVN QVI FEC IT CELVM ET TERAN.

 

 

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